Now until the Feb. 24 Oscar telecast, Take 2 will run a series of posts focusing on issues and subjects involving the Academy Awards.

Glenn Close had spent a decade ruling the New York stage in the mid-1970s before she made her film debut in 1982’s “The World According to Garp,” starring alongside Robin Williams. This role would lay out her cinematic career spanning nearly four decades applauded across theater, film and television. Close would also earn her first of seven Academy Award nominations. Yet, the winner of three Tonys and three Emmys has yet to add an Oscar to her collection.

Glenn Close at her first Academy Awards ceremony in 1983. (ABC News)

This Sunday, she is up for best actress for her role in “The Wife.” This week’s Road to Gold looks at Close’s previous and current nominations as she is the frontrunner in this category. She holds the record for a living actor to have a large number of nominations without a win.’

“The World According to Garp”

“The World According to Garp”

Close was nominated for best supporting actress as Jenny Fields, whose published manifesto makes her a feminist icon and is the mother of a young writer, Garp (Robin Williams). Close lost in 1983 to Jessica Lange for “Tootsie.”

“The Big Chill”

“The Big Chill”

The following year, Close was nominated in the same category for her role as Sarah in the all-star cast that featured Kevin Kline, Jeff Goldblum and William Hurt. In 1984, she lost to Linda Hunt in “The Year of Living Dangerously.”

“The Natural”

“The Natural”

Close received her third straight supporting actress nomination for her roe starring opposite Robert Redford in the baseball drama. She lost to Peggy Ashcroft for her role in “A Passage to India” in 1985.

“Fatal Attraction”

“Fatal Attraction”

After three supporting role nominations, Close ascended to the lead in a career-defying role as the psychopath Alex Forrest in the thriller “Fatal Attraction” opposite Michael Douglas. In 1988, she lost to Cher for “Moonstruck.” (Question: If Close loses to Olivia Colman for “The Favourite,” whose Queen Anne keeps 17 rabbits as companions, would it be a form of “bunny karma” some 30-plus years after the iconic “Fatal Attraction” scene?)

“Dangerous Liaisons”

“Dangerous Liaisons”

Close makes being an evil, meddling woman of society seem some much fun as Marquise de Merteuil in Stephen Frears-directed costume drama. It won three Oscars, except a best actress statuette for Close. She lost to Jodie Foster in “The Accused.”

“Albert Nobbs”

“Albert Nobbs”

In the 1990s and 2000s, Close scored more film roles, like “The Paper,” “101 Dalmatians” and “In & Out,” but she won acclaimed for her television work in “The Shield” and “Damages.” In other words, Close was doing peak TV before it was trendy. In 2011, she starred in the film version of “Albert Nobbs,” based of the play in which she starred in 1982. In the title role, Close played an Irish woman who poses as a man after enduring a sexual assault and wanting to find work. Close also co-wrote the screenplay and wrote its theme song, “Lay Your Head Down.” She lost the best actress Oscar in 2012 to Meryl Streep for “The Iron Lady.”

“The Wife”

“The Wife”

Seven years after her last loss, Close is back with her seventh nomination (her fourth for best actress) in the drama “The Wife.” Close portrays the supportive spouse for a world-famous writer who just won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Compared to her other nominated, leading performances, Close is toned down but still delivers a powerful performance in a film that certainly needed one. Close’s real-life daughter, Annie Starke, plays a younger version of the actress in flashbacks, and Max Irons, who plays her son, is the son of Close’s “Reversal of Fortune” co-star Jeremy Irons.